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The pages of the history of the invention and construction of metronomes, are full of failure and impractical ideas, but if we can find some success. Why a tiny sector attracted so many inventors is a mystery. First attempts in 1581, Galileo Galilei discovered the isochronism of pendulums, i.e., discovered that pendulums equals (of any length) vibrate at the same time regardless if the amplitude is large or small. Close to a century passed before the theory of pendulums was successfully applied to the manufacture of clocks by Christian Huygens (1659) and George Graham (1715). In 1656 patented you first pendulum clock, which allowed to measure time more accurately.

Huygens was built several clocks pendulum to determine the longitude at sea, which made several trips between 1662 and 1686. These inventors solved the problem of pulses of pendulums using a leak or exhaust, that would keep it moving without interfering with its movement. This invention was the key the success was immediately used by those working in the field of metronome. In 1696, Etieune Loulie made the first attempt to apply the pendulum of a metronome. His team was no more than an adjustable pendulum with calibrations, but without exhaust to keep it moving.

It was followed by a line of inventors, including Sauveur, 1711; Enbrayg, 1732; 1771 Gabary, Harrison, 1775; Davaux 1784; Pelletier, Weiske, 1790; Weber, 1813; Stockel, Zmeskall, Aperture, Smart, 1821. Most of these attempts were unsuccessful due to the great length of pendulum needed to imitate some of the slow rhythms used in music (e.g., 40 to 60 per minute). In 1812, Nikolaus Winkel Dietrik (born-1780 Amsterdam, dead-1826) found that a pendulum weighted and double (a weight to each side of the pivot) could oscillate at a slow pace, even when they were short. Johann Nepenuk Maelzel, through some questionable practices, appropriated the idea of Winkel, and in 1816 began to manufacture the so-called metronome Maelzel.